Trends & Roles Reflection: The Web-Conference

My learning partner and I were both very glad to have chosen the topic Teaching Adult Millennials for our Trends & Roles assignment. We found the information in our selected sources to be consistent, interesting and extremely useful. I found the web-conference itself reassuring, in that we had both highlighted many of the same attributes of millennials and had found very little conflicting data. Once we both took a turn “teaching” each other on the topic, we both got excited about the information we gathered, our own observations, and how to apply both.

During the web-conference, I learned from my partner one attribute of millennials that I found counter-intuitive; they desire and perform well with lots of structure. I had assumed that a socially-connected multitasking generation would shun structure, preferring a more organic, play-things-by-ear environment. I suppose the opposite is true because this social, creative group relies on structure to stay on-task and drive to completion. Regardless, I accept that more structure is better for millennial students.

Finally, I was able to share with my learning partner a simple, powerful YouTube video entitled The Myth of Multitasking Test by Dave Crenshaw. The point of the video is that millennials are so accustomed to attempting multiple tasks at once that they often believe it’s more efficient. Crenshaw suggests that humans cannot actually multitask; instead we engage in either “background tasking” or “switchtasking”.  The viewer is then led through a simple exercise to prove how inefficient switchtasking really is.  I won’t spoil it for you … try it for yourself!

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